Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait

More and more births are being scheduled a little early for non-medical reasons. Experts are learning that this can cause problems for both mom and baby. If possible, it’s best to stay pregnant for at least 39 weeks. If your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own.

We know you can’t wait to meet your baby face to face. But getting to at least 39 weeks gives your baby the time he/she needs to grow. There are lots of important things happening to your baby in the last few weeks of pregnancy. For example, your baby’s brain and lungs are still growing.

 

You might not have a choice about when to have your baby. If there are problems with your pregnancy or your baby’s health, you may need to have your baby earlier. But if you have a choice and you’re planning to schedule your baby’s birth, wait until at least 39 weeks.

Why babies need time
Babies born too early may have more health problems at birth and later in life than babies born full term. Here’s why your baby needs 39 weeks:

  • Important organs, like his/her brain, lungs and liver, get all the time they need to develop.
  • He/she is less likely to have vision and hearing problems after birth.
  • Babies born too soon often are too small. Babies born at a healthy weight have an easier time staying warm than babies born too small.
  • He/she can suck and swallow and stay awake long enough to eat after he’s born. Babies born early sometimes can’t do these things.

Why scheduling an early birth can be a problem
Experts are learning that scheduling an early birth for non-medical reasons can cause problems for mom and baby. For example:

  • Your due date may not be exactly right. Sometimes it’s hard to know just when you got pregnant. Even with an ultrasound, your due date can be off by as much as 2 weeks. If you schedule to induce labor or schedule a cesarean birth (also called a c-section) and your date is off by a week or two, your baby may be born too early.
  • Inducing labor may not work. If your labor is induced, the medicine your doctor or certified nurse-midwife gives you, may not start your labor. When this happens, you may need to have a c-section.
  • A c-section can cause problems for your baby. Babies born by c-section may have more breathing and other medical problems than babies born by vaginal birth. (Most babies are born by vaginal birth. The mother’s uterus contracts to help push the baby out through the vagina, also called the birth canal.)
  • C-sections can cause problems in future pregnancies. Once you have a c-section, you may be more likely in future pregnancies to have a c-section. The more c-sections you have, the more problems you and your baby may have, including problems with the placenta.
  • A c-section is major surgery for mom. It takes longer for you to recover from a c-section than from a vaginal birth. You can expect to spend 2 to 4 days in the hospital after a c-section. Then you’ll need 4 to 6 weeks after you go home to fully recover. You also could have complications from the surgery, like infections and bleeding. So it’s important to stay in touch with your health care provider even after you go home.

The March of Dimes Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait™ education campaign and obstetric provider groups advise that you wait until at least 39 weeks to induce labor or have a c-section if it is needed (unless there are medical problems that make it necessary to have your baby earlier).

Sincerely,

Patricia Abraham RN, BSN, CNML
Nurse Manager
The Birthing Center

2011 March of Dimes Foundation. The March of Dimes is a non-profit organization recognized as tax-exempt under Internal Revenue Code section 501(c)(3).

Stay Connected
  • RSS
This entry was posted in Health Care Connection. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>